Monday, April 27, 2015

Alif the Unseen

Alif thought that State cybersecurity are the biggest of his worries. Evading them on his mission to protect his clients, people with opinions forbidden in the Emirate, is hard enough. But when he suddenly steps into a part of the city where he encounters marid, effrit and a book that is even more wanted by State security than he himself is, his life suddenly gets a lot worse.

Alif the Unseen by G. Willow Wilson is Cyberpunk goes 1001 Nights during the Arabian Spring. The setting works really well and the combination of jinn and cybertechnology starts to look fairly natural. But never so natural as to be boring, more like: yeah, okay, sounds logical now that I think about it. I mean, of course jinn will go with the time and acquire their own computers. Create the Jinnternet.

The book has the same kind of energy I love about, for example, Cory Doctorow's novels, the excitement about technology and the changes it brings to society. The new ways people interact and link the online world with the real one. If there is such a distinction to be made at all. It's a fast-paced story, hilarious at times, and yet it always finds time for some philosophy. Seeing technology through the eyes of jinn opens the way for some really creative hacking.

Alif may be the main character, but it's the women who drive this book. In particular, Alif's childhood friend Dina, a deeply religious woman who gets caught up in Alif's problems against her will. I liked it very much that she stays true to her beliefs during the book and doesn't confirm to some Western idea of a free woman. She's independent, but on her own terms, thank you very much.

Reviews 2015

Third book for the Diversity on the Shelves Challenge.

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